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CFILC Press Release

Increasing access and equal opportunity for people with disabilities by building the capacity of Independent Living Centers. Learn more about CFILC and what we do.

New Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) funding provides major support to California Independent Living Centers (ILCs) June 8th, 2021

Sacramento, CA – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACT:
Cameron Moore, 916-612-1520
Communications and Marketing Manager, California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC)

On Thursday, June 3rd, the state of California unveiled a $5.2 billion spending plan to expand Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) for people with disabilities through the state’s Medicaid program. This proposed plan builds on the proposals included in California’s Comeback Plan and is complementary to all of the long-term services and supports work that the state has been working towards.
Part of the spending plan includes the “Expanding Capacity of Independent Living Centers (ILCs)” proposal. This proposal supports transition and diversion services for people with disabilities including transition and diversion through hospital discharge and by addressing the gaps that exist between California Community Transitions (CCT) and other applicable waivers.

The proposal includes the following investments to HCBS:

• Funding to the 28 ILCs dedicated staff to provide the services.

• Funding for transition or diversion services to consumers up to $5,000 per service, with an average of $2,700 per transition service.

• One DOR SSA to provide grant administration.

Funding will be provided to ILCs to hire Transition Coordinators, and to establish the Community Living Fund to use as a mechanism to provide grants to secure housing, housing modifications, assistive technology, in-home care, and other items necessary to enable persons with disabilities to transfer home from a congregate setting. HCBS Allowable Activities: Transition Support including Transition Coordination and One-Time Community Transition Costs.

“This is a significant achievement for Independent Living Centers (ILCs) and the hundreds of individuals who want to transition from congregate living facilities into community-based living options. For years, ILCs have been piecemealing resources together to fulfill the needs of disabled individuals who want the freedom of choice and where to live, but do not have the services and supports to live their best life in the community. CFILC is excited to see the state elevating transition and diversion at this level,” said Christina N. Mills, CFILC Executive Director.

Additional proposal developments include:

• IHSS Specialized Upskilling Pilots $68.4 million enhanced federal funding, supporting the specialized training of IHSS providers to further support consumers.

• IHSS HCBS Care Economy Payments:$137 million enhanced federal funding providing a one-time incentive payment of $500 to each current IHSS provided that provided IHSS to recipient(s) during a minimum of three months between March 2020 and December 2020 of the pandemic.

• DOR’s Traumatic Brain Injury Program: A significant one-time $10 million enhanced federal funding expanding the capacity of existing TBI sites and stand up new TBI sites in alignment with HCBS surrounding transition and diversion through community reintegration, personal care services through supported living services, and other supportive services to improve functional capabilities of individuals with TBI.
Digital Divide: The initiative addresses the Digital Divide for older adults and people with disabilities to prevent isolation and support well-being, while further the goals of the Master Plan for Aging.

The HCBS spending proposals independently help strengthen critical programs that support and empower Californians with disabilities. Collectively, these investments advance the health and well-being of all Californians, as well as their social and economic mobility.

Additional documents and information:

Official statement from the California’s Health and Human Services leaders.

Full California’s HCBS Spending Plan

CHHS California Comeback Plan Fact Sheet


About the California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC):

The California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC) registered 501(c)(3) non-profit Corporation that increases access and equal opportunity for people with disabilities by building the capacity of Independent Living Centers throughout California. To learn more, please visit: visit: cfilc.org


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